Stephen Cox

St Anselm's Altar

Dates: b.1946

Gender: Male

Nationality: British

British sculptor Stephen Cox is known for pieces that have great symbolism rooted in history, tradition and faith. Cox’s study in historically important stone-carving centres has become central in informing the subject, material and style of the work he creates.
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Other artworks in churches by this artist:

Altar and reredos, St Paul Harringay; Eucharist, Cathedral of St Nicholas, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

Biography:

British sculptor Stephen Cox is known for pieces that have great symbolism rooted in history, tradition and faith. Cox’s study in historically important stone-carving centres has become central in informing the subject, material and style of the work he creates.
In the early 1980’s Cox went to Italy to live and study the tools, techniques and philosophy of the great masters. Later in preparation for his piece for the Sixth Indian Triennial, Cox travelled to the Indian village of Mahabalipuram, the centre of a centuries-old temple carving tradition. Cox soon set up a studio in the village, employing local craftsmen as assistants. His piece was to win a major prize at the Triennial. Cox kept his studio in Mahabalipuram; continuing to be inspired by the traditional craftsman and materials he worked with as well as the culture and religions of India.
Cox was commissioned by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to create monumental works for the New Opera House in Cairo as a gift to the Egyptian people. As was his usual way Cox began by immersing himself in the study of Ancient Egyptian carved-stone statuary. Once again Cox found an important element of the work to be the use of a native material. He was to go to great lengths to quarry in almost inaccessible locations of the Egyptian desert. One of these quarries had not been touched in over 4,000 years.
Stephen Cox has exhibited internationally as well as having had solo shows at the Tate Gallery and the Dulwich Gallery. His work is included in the permanent collections of the Tate Gallery, the British Museum, the Ludwig Collection (Cologne) and the Uffizi (Florence).